Sunday, June 1, 2014

The Origin of the Owens

OWEN ORIGINS:

OWEN is a given name occurring in Welsh and Old Irish. Sometimes it is spelled Owain. According to Harrison, the best authority on British names, it is not a Welsh word at all, but a loan-word, borrowed before the year 500 A. D. from the Latin and Greek. It is the same as "eugene" or "eugenius," Greek for "wellborn."

In Welsh most family names are patronymics, that is, they indicate that the person named is "the son or descendant" of somebody. 'Ap' is the Welsh equivalent of the English 'son,' thus John ap Owen, in Welsh, means "John the son of Owen." In English this relationship is also indicated by the use of the possessive form ending in ‘s’. John Owens means "John the son of Owen”. After patronymics were no longer used, some retained the name of OWEN and others used OWENS.

The Owen family has been prominent in the British Empire and in America, its members having played important roles in war and in peace. The list is long of various early Owen families in Wales.

Derived from the Welsh first name Owain, probably from the Latin Eugenius and Greek Eugenious meaning "well born" or "noble" - similar to the first name, Eugene. The plural OWENS may be a patronymic form of OWEN (meaning "son of Owen"), or just a variant spelling.

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OWENS FAMILY LINE COMES FROM:
A product of the ancient Brythonic CELTS of WALES, the name OWEN is from the WELSH personal name of Owen or Owain. The Old Welsh forms of this name were Ouen and ouein and were borrowed from the Latin name Eugenius. This in turn derived from the Greek name Eugenios, which means well-born or noble. The name was recorded in Wales as early as 926 AD, when Uwen Cyning was noted.
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OWENS EARLY ORIGINS:

There are relatively few surnames native to Wales, but they have an inordinately large number of spelling variations. Early variations of Welsh surnames can be explained by the fact that very few people in the early Middle Ages were literate. Priests and the few other literate people were responsible for recording names in official documents. And because most people could not specific how to properly record their names it was up to the individual recorder of that time to determine how a spoken name should be recorded. Variations due to the imprecise or improper recording of a name continued later in history when names originally composed in the BRYTHONIC CELTIC, language of Wales, known by natives as CYMRAEG, were transliterated into English. Welsh names that were documented in English often change dramatically since the native language of Wales, which was highly inflected, did not copy well. Occasionally, however, spelling variations were carried out according to spelling variations of the name Owen have included Owen, Owens, MacOwen, Owenson, Owenby, Ownby and others.

First found in Montgomeryshire, where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.
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OWENS ORIGINS:

OWEN is a given name occurring in Welsh and Old Irish. Sometimes it is spelled Owain. According to Harrison, the best authority on British names, it is not a Welsh word at all, but a loan-word, borrowed before the year 500 A. D. from the Latin and Greek. It is the same as "eugene" or "eugenius," Greek for "wellborn."

In Welsh most family names are patronymics, that is, they indicate that the person named is "the son or descendant" of somebody. 'Ap' is the Welsh equivalent of the English 'son,' thus John ap Owen, in Welsh, means "John the son of Owen." In English this relationship is also indicated by the use of the possessive form ending in ‘s’. John Owens means "John the son of Owen”. After patronymics were no longer used, some retained the name of OWEN and others used OWENS.

The Owen family has been prominent in the British Empire and in America, its members having played important roles in war and in peace. The list is long of various early Owen families in Wales.

Derived from the Welsh first name Owain, probably from the Latin Eugenius and Greek Eugenious meaning "well born" or "noble" - similar to the first name, Eugene. The plural OWENS may be a patronymic form of OWEN (meaning "son of Owen"), or just a variant spelling.